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Published national datasets

24 datasets found


Air Quality Management Areas

Description

Local Authorities have a duty to designate any relevant areas where the air quality objectives are not (or are unlikely to be) being met as Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs). AQMAs must be designated officially by means of an 'order'. The extent of the AQMA may be limited to the area of exceedance or encompass a larger area. Following the declaration of an AQMA, the local authority is required to develop and implement a plan (Air Quality Action Plan) to improve air quality in that area. AQMAs can be for a combination of NO2, SO2, PM10.

Most data provided by local authorities is in polygon format. However, some is provided in point and line form so we are currently buffering such data by the width of a road or so in order to merge them in to the national polygon dataset. Some smaller local authorities e.g. Dundee, use the entire extent of their local authority, as digitised in Ordnance Survey's BoundaryLine dataset, for the AQMA.

We have included data of AQMA declaration in our national schema, though many LAs do not currently provide this.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Air Quality Management Areas - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Air Quality Management Areas data are updated as needed and their last update was on: May 19th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 25 square meters
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 1m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 1m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Alcohol Prohibition Areas

Description

Local authorities have the power to make by-laws to prohibit the drinking of alcohol in designated public places under provisions contained in the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (under sections 201, 202 and 203) subject to confirmation by Scottish Ministers. To date, 27 local authorities across Scotland have by-laws which prohibit the drinking of alcohol in designated public places in more than 480 towns and villages across Scotland, together with the built up areas within the city of Glasgow and Edinburgh have such by-laws. They range from a total ban on drinking at all times, to a ban at specified times or on specified days.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Alcohol Prohibition Areas - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Alcohol Prohibition Areas data are updated as needed and their last update was on: October 27th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are not dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 100 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Article 4 Directions

Description

An Article 4 Direction is not a conservation designation but an additional control within such areas. It is a statement made under The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Scotland) Amendment Order 2011. The Direction, made by a local authority and approved by Scottish Ministers, removes all or some of the permitted development rights on an area. The effect of a Direction is that planning permission will be required for specific types of development which would otherwise be regarded as 'permitted development', i.e. development that does not require a planning application. Directions can cover a variety of minor works and might include: the replacement of doors and windows, the erection of gates, fences, garages, sheds, porches, storage tanks or the installation of satellite antennae.

Some of the features in this dataset will be exactly the same as some Conservation Area sites. But not all conservation areas will have A4Ds in place.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Article 4 Directions - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Article 4 Directions data are updated as needed and their last update was on: July 26th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are not dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 5 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 0.2m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 0.2m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Community Council Boundaries

Description

Community councils are required to be established by local authorities. They are the most local tier of statutory representation in Scotland. They bridge the gap between local authorities and communities and help to make public bodies aware of the opinions and needs of the communities they represent. Community councils are statutory consultees under various processes, such as for planning applications.

There are many instances where polygons do not tessellate or snap to local authority boundaries. The Spatial Hub processing can correct for some minor gap errors (<5m) but not larger ones. Such gaps in the dataset mean that it cannot potentially be used for some kinds of spatial analysis e.g. point in polygon, because some point locations may fall within the gaps. These gaps either require amendment at source or approval for the IS to change.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Community Council Boundaries - Scotland

Open Government Licence: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3/

Community Council Boundaries data are updated annually and their last update was on: July 14th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.
The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 100 square meters
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 5m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 5m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details


Conservation Areas

Description

Under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 a local authority may determine which parts of its area are of special architectural or historic interest and may designate these as Conservation Areas. The public will normally be consulted on any proposal to designate conservation areas or to change their boundaries.There are over 600 Conservation Areas in Scotland. Many were designated in the early 1970s, but some have since been re-designated, merged, renamed, given smaller or larger boundaries and new ones have been added. They can cover historic land, battlefields, public parks, designed landscapes or railways but most contain groups of buildings extending over areas of a village, town or city.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Conservation Areas - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Conservation Areas data are updated as needed and their last update was on: July 25th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are not dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 5 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 0.2m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 0.2m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Contaminated Land

Description

Contaminated land can present significant threats to the environment and risks to users of the land. Land can become contaminated by a variety of substances, from heavy metals to agricultural waste. The environmental, financial and legal implications of this can be substantial.
The management and remediation of contaminated land that, in its current state, is causing or has the potential to cause significant harm or significant pollution of the water environment, is regulated by legislation and underpinned by the core principles of the 'polluter pays' and a 'suitable for use approach'.
Local authorities are the primary regulator for the contaminated land regime and SEPA has certain responsibilities within the scope of this legislation to regulate activities and assist in the management and remediation of contaminated land.

This is the Phase 2 Contaminated Land registered sites.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Contaminated Land - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Contaminated Land data are updated as needed and their last update was on: January 6th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 5 square meters
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 0.2m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 0.2m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

No errors or issues were found in this dataset.


Core Paths

Description

Every local authority and National Park authority (access authorities) in Scotland is required to draw up a plan for a system of paths (core paths) sufficient for the purpose of giving the public reasonable access throughout their area. Most access authorities have now adopted their plans and others are working towards adoption.
Core paths are paths, waterways or any other means of crossing land to facilitate, promote and manage the exercise of access rights under the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003, and are identified as such in access authority core paths plan.

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Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Core Paths - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Core Paths data are updated annually and their last update was on: April 11th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Lines are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum line length allowed in the data is 1 metre
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for lines are not removed
Lines with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a line overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) it is not altered.
Where a line has a gap of up to 1m to another line, it is snapped to it.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Council Asset Register

Description

The Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 places new duties on local authorities.

Part 5: Asset Transfer Requests: Provides community bodies with a right to request to purchase, lease, manage or use land and buildings belonging to local authorities. Local authorities are required to create and maintain a register of land which they will make available to the public.

Part 8: Common Good Property: Places a statutory duty on local authorities to establish and maintain a register of all property held by them for the common good. It also requires local authorities to publish their proposals and consult community bodies before disposing of or changing the use of common good assets.

Part 9: Allotments: It requires local authorities to take reasonable steps to provide allotments if waiting lists exceed certain trigger points and strengthens the protection for allotments. Provisions allow allotments to be 250 square metres in size or a different size that is to be agreed between the person requesting an allotment and the local authority. The Act also requires fair rents to be set and allows tenants to sell surplus produce grown on an allotment (other than with a view to making a profit). There is a requirement for local authorities to develop a food growing strategy for their area, including identifying land that may be used as allotment sites and identifying other areas of land that could be used by a community for the cultivation of vegetables, fruit, herbs or flowers.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Council Asset Register - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Council Asset Register data are updated annually and their last update was on: October 29th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub. For more information visit www.spatialhub.scot.


Employment Land Supply

Description

Scottish Planning Policy sets out the Scottish Governments policies in relation to economic development in Scotland. An Employment Land Audit is produced to monitor the supply, take up and status of employment land in line with National Guidance. The audit assesses the range and choice of marketable sites and locations for businesses with a variety of size and quality requirements. The audit identifies the availability and constraints of employment land sites within the local authority.

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Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Employment Land Supply - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Employment Land Supply data are updated annually and their last update was on: July 10th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are not dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 25 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 1m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 1m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Green Belts

Description

A council development plan may designate a green belt around a city or town to support the spatial strategy by:

- directing development to the most appropriate locations and supporting regeneration;
- protecting and enhancing the character, landscape setting and identity of the settlement; and
- protecting and providing access to open space.

Some digitised polygons in this dataset do not snap to local authority boundaries - though they probably should. We will make efforts to improve the digitisation accuracy of this dataset in consultation with council data contacts.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Green Belts - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Green Belts data are updated annually and their last update was on: January 6th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are not dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 100 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 5m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 5m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Historic Environment Records

Description

HERs (Historic Environment Records) developed out of SMRs (Sites and Monuments Records). SMRs were established from the 1960s onwards in response to the loss of the archaeological resource through urban and rural development. From their original remit of recording archaeological sites, they have been developed to encompass a wide range of information about the historic environment which has been reflected in the change of name from SMR to HER. Today they provide a unique information resource, forming the basis for sustainable conservation and playing an important role in informing public understanding and enjoyment of the local historic environment.
The historic environment includes all aspects of our surroundings that have been built, formed or influenced by human activities from earliest to most recent times. A Historic Environment Record stores and provides access to systematically organised information about these surroundings in a given area. It is maintained and updated for public benefit in accordance with national and international standards and guidance. An HER makes information accessible to all in order to:
- advance knowledge and understanding of the historic environment;
- inform its care and conservation;
- inform public policies and decision-making on land-use planning and management;
- contribute to environmental improvement and economic regeneration;
- contribute to education and social inclusion;
- encourage participation in the exploration, appreciation and enjoyment of the historic environment.

Local authorities and most National Park authorities maintain records of the archaeological, built and natural environment, but many group together to form archaeological services to collate their standardised records. Specialist staff are employed to curate these records and also to provide specialist advice for land-use planning and public information services.

Within this HER dataset there will be two data layers: Historic Environment Sites and Archaeological Interventions (or events).

The Historic Environment Sites dataset will be made up of a mix of two types of features: Known Site Extents and Areas of Archaeological Interest.

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This dataset comprises 2 layer(s):
Historic Environment Records: Sites - Scotland
Historic Environment Records: Events - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Historic Environment Records data are updated as needed and their last update was on: November 10th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Housing Land Supply

Description

Local authorities are required to conduct an annual survey of the housing land supply, 'the Housing Land Audit', to determine completions within the timeframe and update forecasts of the housing land supply. This, in turn, helps inform land releases within the Local Development Plan process. A five-year effective housing land supply is required at all times

We will be working with the Scottish Government housing and planning statisticians to ascertain how we can best append their Housing Land Audit data to the spatial polygons provided to us (similar to how we have created our Vacant and Derelict Land dataset).

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Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Housing Land Supply - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Housing Land Supply data are updated annually and their last update was on: February 7th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 5 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 0.2m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 0.2m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Local Landscape Areas

Description

There are many areas where the scenery is highly valued locally, and local authorities often give these landscapes a local designation. This is to ensure that the landscape is not damaged by inappropriate development, and in some cases encourage positive landscape management. These designations play an important role in developing an awareness of the landscape qualities that make particular areas distinctive and promote a communities sense of pride in their surroundings.

The names used for such Local Landscape Areas currently vary from one local authority to another. For example, they are termed 'Areas of Great Landscape Value' in Moray, 'Special Landscape Areas' in Dumfries and Galloway, and 'Sensitive Landscape Character Areas' in Ayrshire. Guidance published by Scottish Natural Heritage and Historic Scotland (see below) suggests the name be standardised to Local Landscape Areas (LLA) now. LLAs complement the National Scenic Area designation, which identifies those landscapes that are seen as nationally important owing to their unsurpassed scenery.
http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-landscape-areas/

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Local Landscape Areas - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Local Landscape Areas data are updated as needed and their last update was on: October 30th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 25 square meters
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 1m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 1m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Local Nature Conservation Sites

Description

Local nature conservation sites (LNCS) is a non-statutory designation given by local authorities to areas of locally important nature and landscapes. Scottish Natural Heritage, on behalf of the Local Nature Conservation Sites Working Group, published guidance (http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-nature-conservation/) for local authorities on the establishment and management of LNCS systems in Scotland.

One of the LNCS working group's recommendations was that all local authorities should adopt the LNCS name in place of the many different local names. However, many councils still use alternative names for these sites such as Local Biodiversity Sites, Local Wildlife Sites, Local Geodiversity Sites and Sites of Interest for Nature Conservation. We have merged these all into this national dataset.

Some local authorities only provide this data as point datasets. Therefore we have buffered these by 20m (obviously not representative of actual size) in order to merge them into the national polygon dataset.

Several LAs are still to confirm and digitise their LNCSs.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Local Nature Conservation Sites - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Local Nature Conservation Sites data are updated as needed and their last update was on: October 30th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 25 square meters
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Polygons with no key names are not removed
a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 1m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 1m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Local Nature Reserves

Description

Local nature reserves are areas of (at least) locally important natural heritage, designated and managed by local authorities to give people better opportunities to learn about and enjoy nature close to where they live. They are found across the country, but generally close to towns and cities.
More details are available here: http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/lnr/

Where we have not been supplied with data by local authorities we are extracting it from a previously produced SNH national dataset.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Local Nature Reserves - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Local Nature Reserves data are updated as needed and their last update was on: May 18th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 25 square meters
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 1m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 1m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Planning Applications

Description

Development management is the name given to the process of deciding planning applications and various other associated activities including enforcement of planning controls. For the purposes of planning applications, development in Scotland is put into one of three categories – local, major or national. The different categories mean that applications are treated in a way which is suited to the size and complexity of the proposed development and the issues they are likely to raise. Most applications will be for local developments. Major developments include applications for 50 or more homes, certain waste, water, transport and energy-related developments, and larger retail developments. National developments are specific projects which have been identified in the National Planning Framework because of their national importance. Scottish Ministers become involved in a small minority of cases, but only do so where it involves a matter of genuine national interest.

This dataset consists of 3 separate layers:
1. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Points):  A point layer showing an amalgamation of the current year's weekly lists for all Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This should be a complete dataset across Scotland using X/Y co-ordinates, UPRN or postcode as corresponding geometry. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list.
2. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Polygons): A polygon layer showing an amalgamation of the current year's weekly lists for most Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list.
3. Planning Applications (1996 - 2017): A polygon layer showing all previous year's planning applications with summary details for most Scottish planning authorities. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online and is not complete across Scotland.

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This dataset comprises 3 layer(s):
Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Polygons)
Planning Applications - 1996-2017
Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Points)

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Planning Applications data are updated weekly and their last update was on: September 12th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub. For more information visit www.spatialhub.scot.


Polling Districts

Description

A ‘polling district’ is a geographical subdivision of an electoral area such as an electoral Ward within which a polling place is designated.

The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places.

The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Polling Districts - Scotland

Open Government Licence: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3/

Polling Districts data are updated as needed and their last update was on: May 26th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 100 square meters.
Checks for invalid geometry types.
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees.
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data.
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed.
Polygons with no key names are not removed.
a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 5m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 5m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details


Polling Places

Description

A ‘polling place’ is defined as the building or area in which a polling station will be located. A ‘polling station’ is the room or area within the polling place where voting takes place. Unlike polling districts and polling places which are fixed by the local authority, polling stations are chosen by the (Acting) Returning Officer for the election.

The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places.

The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Polling Places - Scotland

Open Government Licence: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3/

Polling Places data are updated as needed and their last update was on: May 26th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.
The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
checks for missing district_code.
checks for duplicate district_code.
checks for no match with district dataset.
checks for missing polling_place attribute.
checks whether points falls outside local authority boundary.
checks whether place feature is not a point format and corrects to centroids where necessary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


School Catchments

Description

Scottish councils usually divide towns and country areas into catchments and children living in a catchment area will usually go to the same local school. Domestic properties typically have a catchment area for each of their local:
- primary non-denominational (PN),
- secondary non-denominational (SN),
- primary denominational/ Catholic (PD) and
- secondary denominational/ Catholic (SN) schools.

This dataset contains four separate layers (representing those above categories), which we deliver together as one single web service or zip folder.

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Additional Information
This dataset comprises 4 layer(s):
School Catchments: Primary denominational (PD) - Scotland
School Catchments: Primary non-denominational (PN)- Scotland
School Catchments: Secondary denominational (SD) - Scotland
School Catchments: Secondary non-denominational (SN) - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

School Catchments data are updated annually and their last update was on: October 28th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 100 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 5m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 5m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Smoke Control Areas

Description

Under Section 18 of the Clean Air Act 1993, many parts of Scotland are Smoke Control Areas. If you live in a smoke control area it is an offence to produce smoke from a chimney of a building, or a chimney of any fixed boiler or industrial plant, unless you're burning an authorised fuel or using exempt appliances (e.g. burners or stoves). In practice this means that in a smoke control area it is illegal to burn house coal or wood in an open fire, although it is legal to burn these in a stove or other appliance that has been approved to burn that fuel. It is also illegal to deliver any unauthorised solid fuels, e.g. wood and normal house coal, to any premises in a smoke control area unless the seller can demonstrate that they were aware that the unauthorised solid fuel is to be burnt in an exempt appliance.

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Metadata

Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Smoke Control Areas - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Smoke Control Areas data are updated as needed and their last update was on: October 30th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 25 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 1m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 1m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Street Furniture

Description

In November 2004, Audit Scotland published a document entitled ‘Maintaining Scotland’s Roads’, effectively introducing a requirement on local authorities in Scotland to produce a Roads Asset Management Plan (RAMP). Following this publication, The Society of Chief Officers for Transportation in Scotland (SCOTS) produced a common asset management framework through which all local authorities could develop their own RAMP. Street assets/furniture are a key part of the RAMP and as such a requirement exists for a national dataset of information. This can include (although is not limited to) features such as bollards, road signs, barriers, parking bays, bus shelters, cattle grids, gates, street lighting columns, benches/seats, information boards, dog/litter/grit bins, cycle stands, ticket machines etc. etc.

We are currently only including furniture types that have been provided by more than one council. These are:
Grit Bins
Street Lights
Traffic Calming
Traffic Signals
Litter Bins
Cattle Grids
Weather Stations
Dog Litter Bins
Benches
Bollards
Picnic Tables
Memorials
Cycle parking

We understand that some local authorities are loading this data into the VAULT system. We will work with the team managing that system to ensure that there is one definitive list in the future.

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Metadata

Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Street Furniture - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Street Furniture data are updated as needed and their last update was on: October 29th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Town Centres

Description

Town centres are defined by local authorities to meet the requirement of Scottish Planning Policy (paragraph 61) to identify town centres and other retail locations as part of a network of centres to support retail type development in the most appropriate locations. This forms part of the sequential test in assessing planning applications.

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Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Town Centres - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Town Centres data are updated annually and their last update was on: July 10th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allowed in the data is 25 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry i.e. self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 1m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 1m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Tree Preservation Orders

Description

*Whilst TPOs are a legal requirement they may not always be digitised accurately. Users of this data should not assume this data is totally accurate and should consult the specific local authority for more detail before making any decisions*

A TPO is made by the Local Authority, under Section 160 of the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997, and within the procedures set out in the Town and Country Planning (Tree Preservation Order and Trees in Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Regulations 1975-1984. They are made to protect individual trees, groups of trees or woodlands which have particular amenity value, make a significant contribution to the landscape or townscape or because there may be a potential threat to the trees. Deciding which trees qualify to become protected the local authority must ensure that the trees contribute to the amenity and attractiveness of an area and be under threat in some way. Either individual specimens or groups can be protected in a single Order. There are no guidelines on which species of tree can be included in an Order.

The process starts with a Provisional Order, this is served on the owner of the land and comes into effect immediately. Once confirmed, the TPO will remain indefinitely and are recorded in the Land Register of Scotland. They then become legal burdens on the land occupied by present and future owners so that when the land is sold on, the title passes on with the TPO.

Some local authorities capture polygons of tree preservation areas. Others will identify actual trees as point TPOs. Several LAs capture both. We have initially created two separate layers - point and polygon, to represent TPOs. This may show duplication where a point falls within a polygon. We may adapt this rationale and methodology in due course as we know that there is discrepancy with Registers of Scotland's TPO data.

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Additional Information
This dataset comprises 2 layer(s):
Tree Preservation Orders PNT - Scotland
Tree Preservation Orders POL - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Tree Preservation Orders data are updated annually and their last update was on: July 27th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are not dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 1 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry and self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 0.2m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 0.2m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.


Vacant and Derelict Land

Description

The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey is a national data collection undertaken to establish the extent and state of vacant and derelict land in Scotland. The survey has been operating since 1988. This survey is associated with the Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, under which cash allocations are made to local authorities.

Every year the Scottish Government Communities Analytical Services produce a comprehensive national survey based on data collected and processed from all Local Authorities and Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority. The Spatial Hub takes this survey data and joins it (using site ID) to the polygon site information provided by local authorities.

To create this dataset we have taken all of the spatial data provided by councils for the current survey year and combined it to this year's statistical survey (using the site reference). However:
- where local authorities have not provided spatial data for the current year, we have used their previous spatial data return and matched the survey data as best we can,
- where there is no spatial data at all for sites we have buffered the easting and northing provided in the survey, to create the rough polygon area for a site.

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Metadata

Additional Information
This dataset comprises 1 layer(s):
Vacant and Derelict Land - Scotland

Use of the data is available to any organisation that is a member of the One Scotland Mapping Agreement. It is not currently commercially available.

Vacant and Derelict Land data are updated annually and their last update was on: June 7th 2017

This dataset was amalgamated, optimised and published by the Spatial hub.

The following quality assurance checks and corrections are carried out on the data:
Polygons are dissolved/ aggregated by key name and local authority.
The minimum polygon area allows in the data is 5 square metres
Checks for invalid geometry types
The maximum angle for any spikes is 3 degrees
Any duplicate geometry is removed from the data
Duplicate key names for polygons are not removed
Polygons with no key names are not removed
Checks for basic geometry and self-intersection
Where a polygon overlaps a local authority boundary (or any other input data) by up to 0.2m we will snap this to the boundary.
Where a polygon has a gap of 0.2m to a local authority boundary (or any other input data) we will snap this to the boundary.

All corrections and issues are captured and communicated via Quality Assurance report maps. Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details

Data collected on: 17 December 2017. This page includes images published by Gregor Cresnar under a Flaticon Basic License and the images can be found at https://www.flaticon.com/packs/multimedia-collection