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Published national datasets

15 datasets found


Air Quality Management Areas

Description
Local Authorities have a duty to designate any relevant areas where the air quality objectives are not (or are unlikely to be) being met as Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs). AQMAs must be designated officially by means of an 'order'. The extent of the AQMA may be limited to the area of exceedance or encompass a larger area. Following the declaration of an AQMA, the local authority is required to develop and implement a plan (Air Quality Action Plan) to improve air quality in that area. AQMAs can be for a combinatino of NO2, SO2, PM10.

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SSDI Record:Air Quality Management Areas


Alcohol Prohibition Areas

Description
Local authorities have the power to make by-laws to prohibit the drinking of alcohol in designated public places under provisions contained in the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (under sections 201, 202 and 203) subject to confirmation by Scottish Ministers. To date, 27 local authorities across Scotland have by-laws which prohibit the drinking of alcohol in designated public places in more than 480 towns and villages across Scotland, together with the built up areas within the city of Glasgow and Edinburgh have such by-laws. They range from a total ban on drinking at all times, to a ban at specified times or on specified days.

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SSDI Record:Alcohol Prohibition Areas


Community Council Boundaries

Description
Community councils are required to be established by local authorities. They are the most local tier of statutory representation in Scotland. They bridge the gap between local authorities and communities, and help to make public bodies aware of the opinions and needs of the communities they represent. Community councils are statutory consultees under various processes, such as for planning applications.

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SSDI Record:Community Council Boundaries


Contaminated Land

Description
Contaminated land can present significant threats to the environment and risks to users of the land. Land can become contaminated by a variety of substances, from heavy metals to agricultural waste. The environmental, financial and legal implications of this can be substantial. The management and remediation of contaminated land that, in its current state, is causing or has the potential to cause significant harm or significant pollution of the water environment, is regulated by legislation and underpinned by the core principles of the 'polluter pays' and a 'suitable for use approach'. Local authorities are the primary regulator for the contaminated land regime and SEPA has certain responsibilities within the scope of this legislation to regulate activities and assist in the management and remediation of contaminated land. This is the Phase 2 Contaminated Land registered sites. In addition, there is a comprehensive and confidential register of potentially contaminated sites subject to ongoing assessment.

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SSDI Record:Contaminated Land


Core Paths

Description
Every local authority and National Park authority (access authorities) in Scotland is required to draw up a plan for a system of paths (core paths) sufficient for the purpose of giving the public reasonable access throughout their area. Most access authorities have now adopted their plans and others are working towards adoption. Core paths are paths, waterways or any other means of crossing land to facilitate, promote and manage the exercise of access rights under the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003, and are identified as such in access authority core paths plan.

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SSDI Record:Core Paths


Green Belts

Description
The development plan may designate a green belt around a city or town to support the spatial strategy by directing development to the most appropriate locations and supporting regeneration protecting and enhancing the character, landscape setting and identity of the settlement; and protecting and providing access to open space.

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SSDI Record:Green Belts


Housing Land Supply

Description
Local authorities are required to conduct an annual survey of the housing land supply, the housing land audit, to determine completions within the timeframe and update forecasts of the housing land supply, in turn informing land releases within the Local Development Plan process. A five year effective housing land supply is required at all times This dataset will be released in phases, with an initial layer published in June 2015 focussing on sites only, for completion Scotland-wide. Over the forthcoming months it will be completed to account for phasing of development based on annual returns with a view to complementing the next audit in 2017.

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SSDI Record:Housing Land Supply


Local Landscape Areas

Description
There are many areas where the scenery is highly valued locally, and local authorities often give these landscapes a local designation. This is to ensure that the landscape is not damaged by inappropriate development, and in some cases encourage positive landscape management. These designations play an important role in developing an awareness of the landscape qualities that make particular areas distinctive and promote a communities sense of pride in their surroundings. The names used for such Local Landscape Areas currently vary from one local authority to another. For example, they are termed 'Areas of Great Landscape Value' in Moray, 'Special Landscape Areas' in Dumfries and Galloway, and 'Sensitive Landscape Character Areas' in Ayrshire. Guidance published by Scottish Natural Heritage and Historic Scotland (see below) suggests the name be standardised to Local Landscape Areas (LLA) now. LLAs complement the National Scenic Area designation, which identifies those landscapes that are seen as nationally important owing to their unsurpassed scenery. http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-landscape-areas/

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SSDI Record:Local Landscape Areas


Local Nature Conservation Sites

Description
Local nature conservation sites (LNCS) is a non-statutory designation given by local authorities to areas of locally important nature and landscapes. Scottish Natural Heritage, on behalf of the Local Nature Conservation Sites Working Group, published guidance for local authorities on the establishment and management of LNCS systems in Scotland. One of the LNCS working group's recommendations was that all local authorities should adopt the LNCS name in place of the many different local names. Here, LNCS includes also regionally important geological sites external site (RIGS) and listed wildlife sites (LWS).

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SSDI Record:Local Nature Conservation Sites


Local Nature Reserves

Description
Local nature reserves are areas of at least locally important natural heritage, designated and managed by local authorities to give people better opportunities to learn about and enjoy nature close to where they live. Local nature reserves are found across the country, but generally close to towns and cities.

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SSDI Record:Local Nature Reserves


Polling Districts

Description
A ‘polling district’ is a geographical subdivision of an electoral area such as an electoral Ward within which a polling place is designated. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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SSDI Record:Polling Districts


Polling Places

Description
A ‘polling place’ is defined as the building or area in which a polling station will be located. A ‘polling station’ is the room or area within the polling place where voting takes place. Unlike polling districts and polling places which are fixed by the local authority, polling stations are chosen by the (Acting) Returning Officer for the election. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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SSDI Record:Polling Places


School Catchments

Description
Scottish councils usually divide towns and country areas into catchments and children living in a catchment area will usually go to the same local school. Domestic properties typically have a catchment area for each of their local non-denominational primary, non-denominational secondary, denominational primary and denominational secondary schools.

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SSDI Record:School Catchments


Town Centres

Description
Town centres are defined by local authorities to meet the requirement of Scottish Planning Policy (paragraph 61) to identify town centres and other retail locations as part of a network of centres to support retail type development in the most appropriate locations. This forms part of the “sequential test†in assessing planning applications.

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SSDI Record:Town Centres


Vacant and Derelict Land

Description
The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey is a national data collection undertaken to establish the extent and state of vacant and derelict land in Scotland. The survey has been operating since 1988. This survey is associated with the Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, under which cash allocations are made to local authorities. Every year the Scottish Government Communities Analytical Services produce a comprehensive national survey based on data collected and processed from all Local Authorities and Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority.

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SSDI Record:Vacant and Derelict Land

Data collected on: 25 June 2017